The World Affairs Council of Charleston hosts six speaking events each year, three in each the spring and fall.  During those seasons, come to this page to find information about each upcoming speaker, and the date and time of the event.

"War in the Caucasus" a Webinar with John Evans, former Ambassador to Armenia

November 23, 2020 at 4:00 PM 
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John Evans, Former American Ambassador to Armenia, and an expert in the region will place the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict in a historical context, briefly review efforts that have been made to solve it, and explain why it has now come to a destructive war. He will also explain why the conflict has entered a new stage involving other regional powers, but has not been completely solved. The conflict, in short, will likely drag on for some time.

John Evans was confirmed by the Senate on June 25, 2004 and was sworn in as the U.S. Ambassador to Armenia on August 11, 2004.  He presented his credentials to President Kocharian on September 4, 2004, and served for two years in Armenia, but then departed  on September 10, 2006, in the wake of differences with the Administration over the issue of the Armenian Genocide.

A native of Williamsburg, Virginia, Mr. Evans studied Russian history at Yale (B.A., 1970) and Columbia, where he began a Ph.D. before joining the Foreign Service. In the first part of his career, he served in Tehran (1972-74), in Prague (1975-78), in the Executive Secretariat and Office of the Secretary of State (1978-80), in Moscow (1981-83), at the U.S. Mission to NATO (1983-86), and as Deputy Director of the Soviet Desk (1986-89). His role in coordinating the American response to the Armenian earthquake of 1988 earned him a medal and statement of appreciation from the Armenian government of that time.

Having won a Cox Fellowship, Mr. Evans set about studying Ottoman history at the Kennan Institute; however, the tumultuous events of 1989 resulted in his being recalled to serve as deputy chief of delegation to four post-1989 experts’ meetings of the CSCE (in Bonn on Economic Cooperation, in Valletta on Peaceful Settlement of Disputes, in Copenhagen on the Human Dimension, and in Krakow on Preservation of the Cultural Heritage). Mr. Evans went on to serve as Deputy Chief of Mission in Prague (1991-94), Consul General in St. Petersburg (1994-97), and Head of the OSCE Mission to Moldova, an international mediation and peace-keeping mission, during the Danish, Polish and Norwegian OSCE chairmanships (1997-99).

On his return to Washington in 1999, Mr. Evans assumed direction of the State Department’s Office of Analysis for Russia and Eurasia, winning a Meritorious Honor Award and the CIA Director’s Exceptional Performance Award. From May 2002 until his appointment to Yerevan, he directed the Office of Russian Affairs.

Ambassador Evans speaks Russian, French, Czech and some Farsi, and has studied Eastern Armenian. He is married to Donna Evans, former President of the World Affairs Council of Washington, and has a daughter, Jennifer, who lives in New York. The Evanses live in Washington and collect folk art representations of Adam and Eve.

Evans is the author of Truth Held Hostage: America and the Armenian Genocide: What Then? What Now?  (London: Gomidas Institute, 2016), 

John Evans was confirmed by the Senate on June 25, 2004 and was sworn in as the U.S. Ambassador to Armenia on August 11, 2004.  He presented his credentials to President Kocharian on September 4, 2004, and served for two years in Armenia, but then departed  on September 10, 2006, in the wake of differences with the Administration over the issue of the Armenian Genocide.

A native of Williamsburg, Virginia, Mr. Evans studied Russian history at Yale (B.A., 1970) and Columbia, where he began a Ph.D. before joining the Foreign Service. In the first part of his career, he served in Tehran (1972-74), in Prague (1975-78), in the Executive Secretariat and Office of the Secretary of State (1978-80), in Moscow (1981-83), at the U.S. Mission to NATO (1983-86), and as Deputy Director of the Soviet Desk (1986-89). His role in coordinating the American response to the Armenian earthquake of 1988 earned him a medal and statement of appreciation from the Armenian government of that time.

Having won a Cox Fellowship, Mr. Evans set about studying Ottoman history at the Kennan Institute; however, the tumultuous events of 1989 resulted in his being recalled to serve as deputy chief of delegation to four post-1989 experts’ meetings of the CSCE (in Bonn on Economic Cooperation, in Valletta on Peaceful Settlement of Disputes, in Copenhagen on the Human Dimension, and in Krakow on Preservation of the Cultural Heritage). Mr. Evans went on to serve as Deputy Chief of Mission in Prague (1991-94), Consul General in St. Petersburg (1994-97), and Head of the OSCE Mission to Moldova, an international mediation and peace-keeping mission, during the Danish, Polish and Norwegian OSCE chairmanships (1997-99).

On his return to Washington in 1999, Mr. Evans assumed direction of the State Department’s Office of Analysis for Russia and Eurasia, winning a Meritorious Honor Award and the CIA Director’s Exceptional Performance Award. From May 2002 until his appointment to Yerevan, he directed the Office of Russian Affairs.

Ambassador Evans speaks Russian, French, Czech and some Farsi, and has studied Eastern Armenian. He is married to Donna Evans, former President of the World Affairs Council of Washington, and has a daughter, Jennifer, who lives in New York. The Evanses live in Washington and collect folk art representations of Adam and Eve.

Evans is the author of Truth Held Hostage: America and the Armenian Genocide: What Then? What Now?  (London: Gomidas Institute, 2016),